10/3/14

My Speech at the All-Candidates’ Meeting


Here’s the two-minute speech I gave Wednesday night at the Collingwood Legion, plus the wrap-up:

In two minutes, I can’t list everything this council and staff have accomplished on your behalf. But here are some highlights:

  • We answered your demand for more ice and water time. Parents no longer have to drive their kids to other towns for meets because we built two beautiful new recreation facilities right here.
  • And we paid for them without going into debt or raising your taxes.
  • In fact, we also paid down the debt by almost $7.5 million while adding $11 million to town reserves this term.
  • We completed an asset management plan.
  • We initiated a long-term financial management plan.
  • We put much-needed new docks in the harbour.
  • We’re upgrading the Eddie Bush arena.
  • We launched very successful bus services to Wasaga Beach and Blue Mountain.
  • We finished First Street and started the reconstruction of Hume Street.
  • We built a new fire hall and renovated the police station.
  • Yet we kept our average tax increase to under one-half a percent per year. That’s less than the cost of living.
  • We launched a small business centre with our community partners to develop and grow local business more efficiently.
  • We hired a marketing and economic development director to promote our town, to attract more industry, more visitors and, most important, more jobs.
  • We even appointed an integrity commissioner to make sure we behave in the most transparent and accountable manner.
  • Our operational and governance reviews are making the town more efficient and your council more effective.

And that’s not all. We’ve accomplished a lot this term. And we can do more next term, including:

We must continue to keep your taxes low. That’s number one.

We need more jobs, more industries, more business. We’re already working on that.

Our harbour has been neglected too long. It must be redeveloped. Together, we can make it the best harbour on Georgian Bay. Our waterfront master plan will guide us.

If you want decisive leadership with vision, and if you want continued financial stability next term, please vote for me, Ian Chadwick.

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09/28/14

On the hustings


Hustings meeting
I’ve been going door-to-door for the past few weeks in my campaign for re-election. Stumping on the hustings, as it’s called in Canada. Or at least that’s how I’ve always heard it used.

Hustings is an odd, old word, an anachronism that survives, seemingly, only in the world of politics. It comes from the days when England was a series of small kingdoms suffering frequent invasions by the Danes and Vikings. A few of the old Germanic and Norse words have managed to survive in our language, reminder of those distant, violent days.

The first known use, Wikipedia says, in a charter dated 1032 CE. But it probably was in oral use long before that document.

Husting derives from an Old Norse word, “hús” which meant ‘house. ’ It combines with “thing ” to make “hústhing,” which meant a ‘household assembly held by a leader.’ The meeting of the men who were in the household of a noble or royal leader. They would be the noble’s ‘cabinet’ or advisors.

Husting later came to mean more generically any assembly or parliament. In Old English, as the Online Etymology Dictionary tells us, it meant ‘meeting, court’ or ‘tribunal.’

The word appears in Middle English – the language of Chaucer – referring to the highest court of the City of London. From there is begins an odd transformation to mean the platform where the Lord Mayor and aldermen presided. By the early 18th century, it meant any temporary platform on which parliamentary candidates were nominated. And by 1719, it came to mean generally a platform for political speeches.

That evolved into an even more general sense of the election process itself. In England, it still refers to a meeting or an assembly where all candidates are present. Or, as Wikipedia says, “a combination of a debate, speeches or questions from the electors.” You can “go to the hustings” or “attend the hustings” as a member of the audience, or as a politician (Word Wizard notes) you can “hit the hustings” or “take to the hustings.”

I’ve often heard it said candidates are “on the hustings” when on the campaign trail, going door-to-door. This isn’t exactly the sense meant by the term, but calling it “stumping” is equally incorrect if we’re to be true to the etymology (see below).

There are online references to a verbal form too: to hust, although I’ve never encountered it in Canada. The singular form of the noun – husting – seems to have vanished while the plural form survives.

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09/26/14

My Rogers’ Cable TV Speech


Each candidate was given three minutes to speak for a spot on Rogers Cable TV recently. Here is what I said (in about two minutes):

Municipal politics is really quite simple. It’s all about people.

Caring about the people you live and work with.

Caring if seniors can afford their taxes. Caring if the sidewalk in front of your neighbour’s house is in good repair.

Caring about parents who had to drive for hours on dark, snowy roads to get their kids to hockey practice in another town because there was no place to play here.

Caring whether the garbage gets picked up, or if there enough places to park your bicycle.

And caring if we have enough doctors and nurses to take care of everyone.

It’s about caring for everyone of every age, and trying to do what’s best so we can all benefit.

It’s also about caring for the places and spaces where people play and work.

Caring about our beautiful parks where you take your dog and your family to.

Caring whether there are empty stores downtown, or if the roads are too bumpy.

Saving a few pieces of green space from development so families don’t lose everything wild and natural around them.

It’s about making sure our trails are safe to ride on. Making sure our streets are safe, and that our homes are safe from fire and vandalism.

It’s about making sure people can afford to live here and that we have industries and business so people can work here, too.

I care about all of these.

But caring alone isn’t enough. You have to do something about it. You need to take action. And that’s what I do as your representative.

I make the decisions I sincerely believe are in the best interests of the whole community.

The decisions that matter most to everyone. Not just to my friends, or my colleagues, or some group I might belong to.

I have the experience to help guide this town through another four years. I have a solid, clear vision of how I want this community to grow and develop. And I am passionate about my role as councillor.
Please re-elect me. I will always put the interests and the needs of the greater good first because that’s what politics means to me.

Thank you for listening and I look forward to your support.

09/26/14

My BIA ACM Speech


This is the speech I gave at the BIA-ACO all-candidates’ meeting, Wednesday evening. The question all candidates had to answer was, “What is your vision to ensure that Downtown Collingwood thrives as a vital economic and cultural part of our community?” We had two minutes to respond. Here’s what I said:

For our downtown to thrive, it needs people. The town can help bring them here. But it is up to the businesses to draw them in.

People come to any downtown for two main reasons: ambiance and experience.

Collingwood already has good ambiance. We have a beautiful heritage district with attractive streets and buildings. But we should dress up Pine and St. Marie Streets more, and make our alleys and laneways more attractive and useful.

The ambiance will further improve when the waterfront development gets restarted and extends the commercial district right to the water’s edge.

Developing our harbour should be a main priority for the new council. A redeveloped harbour will be a significant economic resource. We should even consider a marina and a shuttle service to bring visitors into the downtown. Boaters and other users are all potential customers.

I also want to investigate restoring the former bingo hall as a community resource. It could become a performance space, an indoor market, or a gallery. That would further beautify our downtown.

As for experiences, we need new events and activities that draw both locals and visitors downtown. The Elvis Festival has proven good for this and has brought us great publicity. But we need others.
Events and culture should be treated as economic issues. We have engaged a new marketing and economic development director to craft strategies for pursuing cultural and event tourism.

We should also promote local food. We could make Collingwood the focus of a regional local food festival.

We should consider turning at least one downtown block into a pedestrian mall for part of the summer, with activities, vendors, buskers and public art.

Working with the BIA and our new business development centre, I believe we can make Collingwood’s downtown even more attractive and exciting than it already is.

And here is my wrap-up statement:

I’ve been the council representative on the BIA board for the last four years. I have enjoyed working with the board and helping set goals and directions for the downtown this term.

We have a great downtown, a beautiful downtown that is the heart of this community. But we cannot rest on our past. We need to work with the BIA, with our new marketing and economic development director, with our heritage groups and with council to keep it thriving, to keep it vital and keep attracting people.

If re-elected, I will help accomplish these goals next term.

09/20/14

The Unexamined Life


“The unexamined life,” Socrates declared in his trial, “is not worth living.” His student, Plato, wrote down those words in his account of Socrates’ trial and death, in the book, Apology.*

Socrates was speaking for himself and about the value of his life as a thinking person. He was on trial in 399 BCE for impiety – questioning the gods and introducing new gods – and corrupting youth. His real “crime” was his threat to established thought: he made his followers think, to question everything, to examine their beliefs and their knowledge and determine for themselves its validity. He taught them critical thinking and analysis – a dangerous new way to look at things. It shook the foundations of his society.**

And, of course, here is where Socrates’ approach conflicts with faith. Faith requires us to stop questioning and believe. Socrates exhorted his followers to question. His detractors stood on the firmament of faith. There was bound to be a clash.

The jury found him guilty and sentenced Socrates to death. But more than two thousand years later, Socrates words remain with us, are still repeated and debated today, while the members of the jury and their arguments are long forgotten.

As Stanford University’s Encyclopedia of Philosophy notes about Socrates, of course there were political undercurrents to his trial:

Socrates pursued this task single-mindedly, questioning people about what matters most, e.g., courage, love, reverence, moderation, and the state of their souls generally. He did this regardless of whether his respondents wanted to be questioned or resisted him; and Athenian youths imitated Socrates’s questioning style, much to the annoyance of some of their elders. He had a reputation for irony, though what that means exactly is controversial; at a minimum, Socrates’s irony consisted in his saying that he knew nothing of importance and wanted to listen to others, yet keeping the upper hand in every discussion. One further aspect of Socrates’s much-touted strangeness should be mentioned: his dogged failure to align himself politically with oligarchs or democrats; rather, he had friends and enemies among both, and he supported and opposed actions of both.

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09/15/14

The Emperor’s Handbook


Marcus AureliusMarcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus was considered the last of the “Five Good Emperors” of the Roman Empire. He lived 121-180 CE and died while on campaign in Germany. Like many Roman thinkers of his day, he followed the popular Stoic philosophy and his writing became an important document in the late Stoic phase of classical antiquity.

While he ruled, Marcus Aurelius kept notes – written in Greek – about his thoughts and beliefs, as a guide for his own life and behaviour, applying his Stoic beliefs to his everyday life.

These thoughts were never intended for public reading or publication such as it was in that time (since the printing press would not come into use for roughly another 1,300 years, for works to circulate they needed to be hand-copied). He titled them simply “For Myself.” They have become known today as The Meditations.

A central theme to Meditations is to analyze your judgement of self and others and developing a cosmic perspective. As he said “You have the power to strip away many superfluous troubles located wholly in your judgement, and to possess a large room for yourself embracing in thought the whole cosmos, to consider everlasting time, to think of the rapid change in the parts of each thing, of how short it is from birth until dissolution, and how the void before birth and that after dissolution are equally infinite”. He advocates finding one’s place in the universe and sees that everything came from nature, and so everything shall return to it in due time. It seems at some points in his work that we are all part of a greater construct thus taking a collectivist approach rather than having an individualist perspective. Another strong theme is of maintaining focus and to be without distraction all the while maintaining strong ethical principles such as “Being a good man”.

After his death, his writings were saved – by whom, no one knows for sure – and shared. And copied over the centuries. Copies in Greek survived until the mid-16th century when it was first printed (1558). It was translated into English shortly after and had undergone numerous translations ever since.

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